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World Parkinson's Week - Apr 10th-16th



Parkinson's disease is a neurological condition that worsens over time and impairs movement. It is brought on by the loss of dopamine, a neurotransmitter essential for movement and coordination, as a result of the degeneration of dopamine-producing neurons in the brain. Tremors, rigidity, slowness of movement, issues with balance and coordination, as well as changes in speech and writing, are all signs of Parkinson's disease. Depression, anxiety, sleep issues, and cognitive impairment are examples of additional non-motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease is normally diagnosed based on clinical symptoms, and imaging tests like a CT scan or MRI may be used to confirm the diagnosis. Although Parkinson's disease does not presently have a cure, medicines and other therapies can help manage symptoms and enhance a person's quality of life.


The majority of critical illness insurance policies will offer some protection against Parkinson's disease. Depending on the insurer you are with, the cover amount may differ from one to the next, for example, you can get a full critical illness through HSBC.

Critical illness insurance pays out a lump sum if you are diagnosed with an insured illness or condition. The cover is usually added to life insurance policies (level-term and mortgage protection) but can be bought independently. Many plans cover in excess of 40 serious illnesses, including; several types of cancer, heart attack, stroke, and multiple sclerosis.


Life insurance pays out upon death, whereas critical illness cover pays out upon diagnosis of an insured condition. This is why both policies are often sold as dual policies. They ensure different events, but both protect against financial difficulties.


For articles on life insurance click here.


To start and get covered within 3 minutes click here.


To book a call back with one of our team click here.


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Phone: 0333 188 7617



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